Infected with coronavirus

If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you must self-isolate as soon as possible, including from those you live with.

Updated: 22 November 2021

If you are infected with coronavirus, you are encouraged to self-isolate as soon as possible and contact the Danish Patient Safety Authority’s contact tracing hotline, Coronaopsporing, who can help you identify and notify close contacts who may be infected and therefore be at risk of infecting others.

Important information

Stricter guidelines for the Omicron variant

Stricter guidelines apply for infection detection in the event of infection or suspicion of infection with the new COVID-19 virus variant Omicron.

The following applies to:

  • Close contacts with a person who is infected or suspected of being infected with Omicron.
  • Close contacts to a close contact to a person who is infected or suspected of being infected with the Omicron variant.

It is recommended:

  • To go into self-isolation regardless of vaccination status.
  • PCR test on days 1, 4 and 6.
  • Self-isolation can be eliminated by negative response to the last test on day 6.

 

Call the contact tracing hotline

You can get help tracing your close contacts by calling the contact tracing hotline on +45 32 32 05 11 and pressing 1. The contact tracing hotline is available to help every day from 08:00 to 22:00.

In order to find your close contacts, the contact tracing hotline needs:

  • the full names of the people you have been in contact with;
  • a phone number or email address of the close contact; and
  • the date you were in close contact with the person.

Once the contact tracing hotline has this information, they can start calling the contacts. 

Download a form for tracing close contacts from the Danish Patient Safety Authority (stps.dk)

Infected child

If your child has tested positive for COVID-19, it is important that they immediately self-isolate.

When possible, you should keep your distance from your infected child. However, children need loving care and physical contact like hugs and comforting, and this is far more important than keeping your distance. Everyone in the household should pay extra attention to good hygiene and cleaning, and to whether they develop symptoms themselves.

Call the contact tracing hotline on +45 32 32 05 11 and press 1. The contact tracing hotline can help you get in touch with the close contacts your child may have infected. In order to stop the spread of infection, you should quickly contact those your child has been in contact with.

Read more about infection in children at the Danish Patient Safety Authority’s website (in Danish)

Self-isolation

If you are infected, or at risk of being infected, you must self-isolate. This also means that you should keep your distance from people you live with.

Self-isolation means:

  • You should stay at home and not meet with people you do not live with.
  • You should avoid close contact with people you live with.
  • You need to pay extra attention to maintaining good hygiene and cleaning.

 

Income during self-isolation

Here you will find the current rules for financial support when infected with coronavirus.

If an employee has to go into self-isolation due to COVID-19, there will be a legal due date, and he or she may be entitled to full pay or sickness benefits.

Employees in self-isolation should work from home as far as possible. If you cannot work at home, it depends on the specific employment relationship whether you are entitled to pay during the period or not. If you are not entitled to pay, employees who are either infected or have a realistic presumption of being infected will be entitled to sickness benefits. The same applies to close contacts who are in self-isolation as a result of infection detection. In all cases, however, the conditions for entitlement to sickness benefit must be met, and therefore there will be persons who cannot receive sickness benefit even if they are infected with COVID-19.

Parents may be entitled to sickness benefit or maternity benefit if their child is in self-isolation. You can read more on borger.dk.

 

A self-employed person who is either infected with COVID-19 or has a realistic presumption of being infected, or is in close contact, will be able to receive sickness benefits from the first day of absence if the conditions of the law are otherwise met. Read more on virk.dk.

The workplace can, as a rule, receive reimbursement if wages are paid during illness and the employee would be entitled to sickness benefits.

Voluntary out-of-home stays

If you cannot keep your distance from others in your household (for example if you live in a small home or because you live with someone at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19), you can be granted a voluntary out-of-home stay by your municipality.

You must have tested positive for COVID-19 before you can be granted an out-of-home stay.

Ring your municipality to find out more about your options.

Read more and download the pamphlet about self-isolation and voluntary out-of-home stays on the Danish Health Authority’s website (in Danish)

Forced to leave self-isolation?

Use a face mask with a CE mark if you need to break your self-isolation briefly in exceptional circumstances, such as going to the hospital or to be tested.

Infection-free

You are free from infection and can stop self-isolating when you have been symptom-free for 48 hours. If you haven’t had symptoms, you should self-isolate until seven days after your test was taken.

Contact your own doctor if your condition worsens.

Test for COVID-19

Get tested when you have symptoms or are a close contact

In order to prevent the spread of infection, it is important that you take a PCR test when you have symptoms of COVID-19 or are a close contact of someone who has tested positive.

FAQs

About being infected with coronavirus

Updated: 25 June 2021

If you have taken a PCR test that shows you are infected with COVID-19, you must self-isolate as soon as possible so that you do not infect others. You should also isolate away from those you live with. If you do not have the option to self-isolate at home, you can contact your municipality that may be able to grant you a voluntary out-of-home stay.

Call the contact tracing hotline on 32 32 05 11. They will provide guidance on what to do and help with identifying close contacts that you may have infected.

If you get a positive quick test result, you should be tested again as soon as possible with a PCR test. A PCR test is more sensitive than a quick test, so it can confirm whether the first test was positive, or if you are actually negative. It can also tell you if you are infected with a particular variant. You must self-isolate until the new PCR test has shown that you are not infected. You can leave to be tested, but avoid public transport. Remember to use a face mask and to keep your distance.

  • Call the contact tracing hotline on 32 32 05 11. Here you will receive guidance on what to do, and a referral for a PCR test to confirm the result of your quick test (antigen test). If the PCR test is negative and you do not have symptoms, you may be able to stop self-isolating, but you must first call the contact tracing hotline.

If your child has tested positive for COVID-19, it is important that they self-isolate immediately. If your child is at an age where self-isolation isn’t possible, it is recommended that they isolate together with a parent. If it is difficult to isolate within your home, you can contact your municipality, who may be able to grant a voluntary out-of-home stay for the child and a parent.

Call the contact tracing hotline on 32 32 05 11. Here you will receive advice on what you and your child should do, and get help on identifying your child’s close contacts. The school/childcare management must be notified, so they can take the necessary precautions and inform parents of other children who may have been exposed to infection.

There will be intensive contact tracing if you are infected with certain virus variants. Some variants are particularly contagious, while others involve a of infecting those who have been vaccinated or have previously been infected with coronavirus.

The intensive contact tracing includes special attention on whether the infected person has travelled abroad or been together with others who have been abroad. In addition, close contacts of the infected person are mapped (secondary contacts), as are the close contacts of those individuals (tertiary contacts). If there is a risk of the infection spreading, the close contact of the close contacts will be asked to self-isolate and be tested in the same way as the close contacts. Please note that special rules may apply if the close contact with a virus variant has been fully vaccinated.

The most important way of preventing the spread of infection is by ensuring that you self-isolate if you are infected or are a close contact of someone infected with COVID-19.

This means that you must stay at home and isolate from those you live with. Do not go to work, avoid shopping and walks, and ask others to walk the dog. Get help with shopping, or if you have goods delivered, have them left at your door. Use a face mask with a CE mark, and keep a distance of two metres from others if you do have to go out in exceptional circumstances, for example if you need to be tested.

Avoid physical contact with others in the home, and keep a distance of at least two metres. This is particularly important if you live with someone who is at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. Sleep in a separate room and avoid spending time in the same room. It is also recommended that you use a separate toilet/bathroom. If this isn’t possible, you should clean surfaces, such as handles and taps, before the bathroom is used by other members of the household.

If it is not possible to self-isolate at home, you can contact your municipality that may be able to grant you a voluntary out-of-home stay.

If you cannot keep your distance from others in the household, for example if you live in a small home, or because you live with someone at higher risk severe illness from COVID-19, your municipality may be able to help you with a voluntary out-of-home stay. You must have tested positive, or be a close contact of someone who has tested positive, before you can be granted an out-of-home stay. Call your municipality to find out more about your options.

If you have had symptoms, you are no longer considered contagious and can stop self-isolating when you have been symptom-free for 48 hours. You can also stop self-isolating after 10 days of illness if you have been free from fever for the past 48 hours (without the use of, for example, paracetamol), you feel significantly better, and only have mild residual symptoms, such as loss of taste and/or smell, a slight cough, headache, fatigue, etc.

If you have not had any symptoms, you are no longer contagious and can stop self-isolating 7 days after you took your test.

When you are infected and isolating together with someone else also infected, you should take your own course of illness as the starting point. You must therefore not stop isolating before you are free from infection. You do not have to wait for the other infected person you are isolating with to be free from infection. See the FAQs about when you are considered to be free from infection.

However, it is important to pay extra attention to good hygiene and cleaning when you finish isolating, so that you minimise the risk of bringing the virus out of the home.

You do not need to be tested again to be regarded as having recovered. The test can be positive due to inactive virus, even if you are healthy and no longer able to infect anyone else. It is therefore not necessary to have a negative test before being able to return to work, school, etc.

The health authorities recommend that you wait a month after overcoming the illness before being vaccinated.